Object of the Week: Highlighting the LCHA Collections

Screw Type Candlestand: An Example of Yankee Ingenuity Made of maple and birch, this candlestand consists of a long shank inserted into a round base supported by three legs. Spiral grooving in the upper section of the shank permit two critically important components to rotate up and down the upper length of the shank. The first functions as a round …

Object of the Week: Highlighting the LCHA Collections

Tape Loom In the eighteenth century, women’s clothing didn’t have buttons. Instead, it was held together with pins, strings and tape/ribbons. This was partly because of fashion, and partly because a married woman were likely to have a baby every two years, and was continually changing size. Different types of strings and tape were needed: flat so it wouldn’t dig …

Object of the Week: Highlighting the LCHA Collections

Flax Wheel A recent Object of the Week article discussed the Wool Wheel or Great Wheel.  Its counterpart was the Flax Wheel, sometimes called the Foot Wheel.  With the Great Wheel, the spinner had one hand free to control the fibers as they were spun into yarn; the other hand would be turning the wheel.  The Flax Wheel allowed the …

Object of the Week: Highlighting the LCHA Collections

Candles and How to Make Them Candles are a pleasant source of light. In the eighteenth century, they were preferred over “rush lights” and “fat lamps” because they smelled better and flickered less. Oil lamps were a new invention, and not yet popular in New England. Candles can be made in three ways: dipping, molding, and ladling. Dipped candles are …

Object of the Week: Highlighting the LCHA Collections

A Tale of Two Kettles One thing the Collections Committee does is strive for the best possible displays in our museums, not only to enhance the “look,” but to strengthen our collection’s historical accuracy and thoroughness. These two kettles at the Pownalborough Court House are an excellent case in point, and they illustrate why another one of our duties is …

Object of the Week: Highlighting the LCHA Collections

Chest of Drawers This early 19th century chest of drawers is one of a long line of similarly conceived types of case furniture that were ubiquitous in 18th and 19th century homes. They were designed to house personal clothing and precious objects including textiles. Most consist of four drawers usually graduated with the shallowest drawers above and the deepest below. …

Object of the Week: Highlighting the LCHA Collections

Hay Rake This horse drawn, walk behind, hay rake was used prior to putting the same principle to use and putting wheels on it. The operator would walk behind the rake, holding onto the lever that is the “trip” mechanism. When the tines were full of hay the operator would lift the lever, locking it into a cog, and continue …

Object of the Week: Highlighting the LCHA Collections

The Great Wheel Household textiles needs of the 18th Century differ little from those of the 21st Century.  Households then, as today, require dish towels, table linens, clothing, sheets, and blankets just to name the basics. In the Chapman-Hall House there is a display of textile tools used to make yarn/thread. The Chapmans were an average 18th Century family.   Even …

Object of the Week: Highlighting the LCHA Collections

Roundabout Chair This seemingly unusual chair design was actually surprisingly popular in the English-speaking colonies of North America during the 18th century. Examples exist in various styles charting the evolution from the turned examples of the William and Mary period through the Queen Anne mode defined by its cabriole legs and vase shaped splats. The latest and most elaborate examples …

Object of the Week: Highlighting the LCHA Collections

Noah’s Ark, the Sunday Toy The most popular toy in all of Europe and America was by far the Noah’s Ark. Inspired by sacred history it was commonly known as the Sunday Toy. In Colonial America and even late into the nineteenth century, the Sabbath was observed with the greatest dignity and reverence, and toys were put away on that …